Tea or Books? #11: ebooks vs books and Nancy Mitford vs Evelyn Waugh

 

Tea or Books logoEbooks! Books! Nancy Mitford! Evelyn Waugh! We’ve got it all for you in episode 11, as we turn our attention to the well-worn path of ebooks vs paper books/tree books/real books (whatever you want to call them) and to Nancy Mitford vs Evelyn Waugh. We’d love to hear your views on these topics, particularly suggestions for Miford or Waugh books to read. Download through your podcast app of choice, or via our iTunes page.

Suggestions for future topics couldn’t be more welcome – particularly if they come in an X vs Y format, as sometimes it is quite hard to work ideas into our Tea vs Books pattern of doing things. Apologies for any popping on the microphone. Apparently using a mug as a mic stand doesn’t work as well as one might think.

Here are the books and authors we mention in episode 11…

In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
Death on the Riviera by John Bude
The Eye of Love by Margery Sharp
Barbara Pym
The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
Christine by ‘Alice Cholmondeley’ (Elizabeth von Arnim)
The Lark by E. Nesbit
Guard Your Daughters by Diana Tutton
The Other Day by Dorothy Whipple
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Moby Dick by Herman Melville
The 100 Best Novels by Robert McCrum
The Pursuit of Love by Nancy Mitford
Wigs on the Green by Nancy Mitford
Pigeon Pie by Nancy Mitford
Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
The Loved One by Evelyn Waugh
Decline and Fall by Evelyn Waugh
Put Out More Flags by Evelyn Waugh
Scoop by Evelyn Waugh
Love in a Cold Climate by Nancy Mitford
Christmas Pudding by Nancy Mitford
E.F Benson
Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh
F. Scott Fitzgerald
The American Way of Death by Jessica Mitford
The Letters of Nancy Mitford and Evelyn Waugh
The Mitfords: Letters Between Six Sisters ed. Charlotte Moseley

10 thoughts on “Tea or Books? #11: ebooks vs books and Nancy Mitford vs Evelyn Waugh

  • February 4, 2016 at 12:52 am
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    This is the first time I listened to your show and I enjoyed it. You two make a great team.

    Reply
    • February 11, 2016 at 11:39 am
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      Aw, thanks Terra! We have such fun recording it.

      Reply
  • February 4, 2016 at 2:00 am
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    This is the first time for me as well to listen to a podcast. The comment your guest made on the Truman Capote book, about it being well-written, made me want to chip in this tidbit: You will come across mention of Nelle Harper “Lee assisted close friend Truman Capote in his research for the book In Cold Blood.” Well, it’s more like she did the research for him – since it involved interviewing the locals which he wasn’t something he felt comfortable doing.

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    • February 11, 2016 at 11:40 am
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      I have heard rumours that she wrote the whole thing, though I don’t know if anybody gives those credibility. All very intriguing!

      Reply
  • February 4, 2016 at 4:57 pm
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    It’s Daniel Day Lewis who was in the movie The Age of Innocence, by the way. Excellent movie!

    Simon, I blame you for the fact that I not only bought the complete works of E. Nesbit on Delphi Classics, but also Rafael Sabatini, Sir Walter Scott, Margaret Oliphant, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Wilkie Collins, and Alexandre Dumas.

    Reply
    • February 11, 2016 at 11:41 am
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      Ahha, thanks for that, Kay!
      And I am not remotely sorry ;) Hope you enjoy the hours and hours of reading you’ve got there!

      Reply
  • February 5, 2016 at 8:48 am
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    I had to give up on Decline and Fall, the cruel racism directed towards one character was just too much for me. Whether it was Waugh or the character it still was unacceptable.

    Love the podcast, always look forward to it.

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    • February 11, 2016 at 11:42 am
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      Thanks so much, David! And yes, Waugh can be SO cruel that it’s hard to bear.

      Reply
  • February 11, 2016 at 8:38 am
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    On the subject of ebooks one major advantage was overlooked, adjustable type size! I find that many paperbacks have very small print and are hard for me to read even with my varifocals. With the kindle, no problem!

    Reply
    • February 11, 2016 at 11:43 am
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      That’s a very good point! Not such an option on the app, I think (though I haven’t investigated thoroughly…)

      Reply

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