Stuck-in-a-Book’s Weekend Miscellany

My day started with pancakes and went on to pie (a mushroom, spinach, hazelnut and white truffle oil pie, since you ask = bliss), so it’s all going pretty well. My intention to read all day isn’t going great, although I am loving David Sedaris in brief snatches. And not reading the two books I told myself I’d read today. Still, it’s only 5.30pm, so still plenty of reading time left today – and time to give you a few bits of miscellaneous linking.

1.) You may know that Oliver Sacks is one of my heroes, and I love his books (and his humanity). His heroism continues in this beautiful, sad, wise piece for the New York Times about learning that he has terminal cancer.

2.) In a totally different tone, you might enjoy this quiz I put together in honour of Go Set a Watchman being announced: it is titles of books which are taken from elsewhere. Half are from the Bible; half are not. Can you tell which is which? (And thanks Susan for pointing out to me that Go Set a Watchman borrows its title from the Bible! I’m ashamed that I didn’t realise that myself.)

3.) Helene Hanff’s Letter from New York is on my bedside table, so I was excited to see Ali’s review of it – especially since it’s rather glowing.

4.) Do you (like me) love bad films? Not just mediocrity, but the ones with a script, direction, acting, and sound quality so bad that you ask ‘How did this get made?‘ Well, that just so happens to be the title of a hilarious podcast I discovered recently. It’s been going for four or so years, so there should be something in the archives to whet the appetite.

14 thoughts on “Stuck-in-a-Book’s Weekend Miscellany

  • February 21, 2015 at 6:58 pm
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    I surprised myself on the quiz with a 7/10 score! :) Letter from New York sounds just wonderful – I have a copy lurking too!

    kaggsysbookishramblings

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    • February 22, 2015 at 10:55 pm
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      Good work, Karen!
      My copy has edged its way ever closer to my attention… hopefully this year will be the year of reading it.

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  • February 21, 2015 at 9:26 pm
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    Thank you for linking to the Helene Hanff review – I LOVED 84 Charing Cross Road. I may have read it 3 times in one weekend at one point. I didn't know she'd had other books published so yay! I'm also currently listening to the How Did This Get Made podcast on the movie Toys. I am cautious, because it's one of my fave movies, but at the same time I do acknowledge that it is one WEIRD movie!

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    • February 22, 2015 at 10:55 pm
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      Isn't it lovely? I've only read it once – but have also read Q's Legacy, which is a sort of behind the scenes about writing 84CCR, and its success – you will love it.

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  • February 22, 2015 at 10:42 am
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    Glad you like the sound of Letter from New York Simon, I have a feeling you would love it.

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    • February 22, 2015 at 10:56 pm
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      I've read three or four of Hanff's books, and have a few more waiting, so I'm sure I will!

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  • February 22, 2015 at 3:21 pm
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    Oh, time for a rewatch of 84CCR. Love love love it.That was one book that I said couldn't possibly be made into a film. How wrong I was.

    No, I don't love bad films. I generally ignore their existance. But I truly loath dull dull films that I get suckered into seeing at a theatre, where I can't just shut it off. A River Runs Through It was bad enough, but The Scent of Green Papayas was the dullest ever.

    Sorry to rant. No, I'm not.

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    • February 22, 2015 at 6:47 pm
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      Ha – the Scent of Green Papayas went on for EVER and I thought I was a bad person for being bored. I can still remember how bored I was and I saw it in about 1993 …

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    • February 22, 2015 at 10:57 pm
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      It is astonishing that the film is as good as it ended up, as it does seem like an unfilmable book.

      And dull films are definitely the worst, but there is a special joy to outright terrible films!

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  • February 22, 2015 at 6:49 pm
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    I thought of you when I saw the gutting news about Oliver Sachs – I can't bear it and couldn't actually bear to read the whole piece, even though I knew it would be amazing.

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    • February 22, 2015 at 10:57 pm
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      It is very moving, and very positive. I wouldn't expect anything else from him. I don't think he has a negative or cynical bone in his body.

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  • February 23, 2015 at 1:38 am
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    We were so sad to read the news about Oliver Sacks at our house, but also excited to read that he's got another autobio coming out. You shouldn't feel shamed about the Isaiah reference – esp. since I've got about 20 years on you! :) Off to try the quiz…

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  • February 23, 2015 at 2:48 am
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    That podcast sounds fun – will have to check it out on my commute tomorrow.

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  • February 23, 2015 at 11:23 am
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    THANK you for writing about Oliver Sacks's piece in the NY Times: I would have missed it otherwise and I so admire the man's courage, his thoughtful enquiries into the states of our minds, his eloquent writing and his philosophical gratefulness in the face of death.

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