A quick plea…

Does anyone have access to US magazine Time online archives?  There’s an article I want to read – the July 28th 1930 review of The Love Child, to be precise – but I can only see the first two lines without paying a big subscription.  Chuh.  So if anyone had access to it and wanted to send me the review in full, you’d have my eternal appreciation…

(Sorry there was no Weekend Miscellany… long day yesterday.  Get ready for Australian Literature Month AND Henry Green Reading Week colliding next week.  I’ve read one for the former, and started one for the latter…)

10 thoughts on “A quick plea…

  • January 21, 2012 at 12:01 pm
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    Can't you use your public library card to access Times on line back in the 30s? I think we can here in Somerset. I'll give it a try.

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  • January 21, 2012 at 1:04 pm
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    Careful, the copyright police will be after you!

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    • January 21, 2012 at 1:09 pm
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      I know, I know… but my need for research outweighs my desire to avoid their ire!

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    • January 21, 2012 at 5:57 pm
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      Hmmm, I thought you were a librarian in another life? Surely Oxford University has access to this don't they? I'm happy to help, but I see you have what you need if I understand the next post.

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  • January 21, 2012 at 1:20 pm
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    There's a review of 'The Triumphant Footman' on that date, but not 'The Love Child'. Ref: 07/28/1930, Vol. 16 Issue 4, p57 [1p]. It is short, so I'll paste:

    "THE TRIUMPHANT FOOTMAN—Edith Olivier—Viking ($2.50). Author Edith Olivier may be pigeonholed in the David Garnett (Lady into Fox, A Man in the Zoo) school. Like David Garnett she makes oblique and delicate fun of people apparently mid-Victorian, on second glance timeless, pos-sibly contemporary.

    Alphonse Biskin, son of a Cockney father, a French mother, has a happy gift for languages which stands him in good stead when he takes service with Mr. and Mrs. Lemaur, English couple who spend most of their time in Italy. Lighthearted, with a sense of humor he finds uncontrollable, Footman Alphonse one evening impersonates a learned Spaniard, the expected guest of honor at a party his employers are attending. His impersonation is more successful than he could have hoped, leads to other, equally amusing adventures. Eventually he finds himself a man of means, and audaciously attempts a final and complete impersonation. He marries, happily and above him, but echoes of his first folly surround him and nearly prove his undoing. But his incorrigible gaiety, his wife's amused devotion, his author's smiling sympathy, give him a timely curtain, the audience's applause.

    Other books: The Love-Child, As Far as Jane's Grandmother's."

    TIME is available to libraries subscribed to EBSCO (Academic Search Premier), btw.

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    • January 21, 2012 at 1:25 pm
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      That's the one I wanted! It wasn't clear from the snippet I had which book was being reviewed – thank you, you're such a star!

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  • January 21, 2012 at 1:22 pm
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    Oh, and the article is called 'Picaresque Crichton', sorry, left that off.

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    • February 4, 2012 at 6:36 pm
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      Very late in the day to ask, but did you manage to see who wrote the article? Thanks so much! S

      Reply

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