Tea or Books? #47: sequels vs new-author sequels, and A Compass Error vs Pleasures and Landscapes

Sybille Bedford and sequels by the original author vs sequels by a different author… we need to come up with snappier titles for these things.


 
In episode 47, we start with a topic suggested by Karen via email – sequels, and whether or not we like sequels written by a different author to the original book. In the second half, we look at a novel (a sequel, in fact) by Sybille Bedford alongside some of her travel writing – A Compass Error (a sequel to A Favourite of the Gods) and Pleasures and Landscapes. This is also a contribution to the 1968 Club, because A Compass Error was published in 1968.

Check out our iTunes page, leave us a review via an app should you wish. And let us know which books you’d recommend!

Here are the (many!) books and authors we mention in this episode:

Stephen Leacock
Hetty Dorval by Ethel Wilson
The Equations of Love by Ethel Wilson
Swamp Angel by Ethel Wilson
My Remarkable Uncle by Stephen Leacock
Stephen Leacock by Margaret MacMillan
Letters of Margaret Laurence and Adele Wiseman
A Journey Round My Skull by Frigyes Karinthy
Oliver Sacks
Coral Glynne by Peter Cameron
Thrush Green series by Miss Read
The Sense of the Ending by Julian Barnes
The Past is Myself by Christine Bielenberg
Mrs de Winter by Susan Hill
Go Set A Watchman by Harper Lee
The L-Shaped Room by Lynne Reid Banks
The Backward Shadow by Lynne Reid Banks
Two is Lonely by Lynne Reid Banks
Rebecca’s Tale by Sally Beauman
Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
Mrs Darcy’s Dilemma by Diana Birchall
Wide Sargasso Sea by Jean Rhys
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
Sense and Sensibility by Joanna Trollope
Northanger Abbey by Val McDermid
Old Friends and New Fancies by Sybil Brinton
Longbourn by Jo Baker
Peter Pan in Scarlet by Geraldine McCaughrean
Return to the Hundred Acre Wood by David Benedictus
Winnie the Pooh by A.A. Milne
The House at Pooh Corner by A.A. Milne
Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
Good Wives by Louisa May Alcott
The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
Mary Poppins series by P.L. Travers
Guy Fraser-Sampson
Mapp and Lucia series by E.F. Benson
Fifty Shades of Grey by E.L. James
The Starlight Barking by Dodie Smith
The Hundred and One Dalmatians by Dodie Smith
The Book of the Green Planet by William Kotzwinkle
The War of the Worlds by H.G. Wells
Jo’s Boys by Louisa May Alcott
Little Men by Louisa May Alcott
Closing Time by Joseph Heller
Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
Paradise Regained by John Milton
Paradise Lost by John Milton
The Second Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
Provincial Lady series by E.M. Delafield
Guard Your Daughters by Diana Tutton
Unguarded Moments by Diana Tutton
The Enchanted August by Brenda Bowen
The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim
Elizabeth and Her German Garden by Elizabeth von Arnim
A Solitary Summer by Elizabeth von Arnim
In a Summer Season by Elizabeth Taylor
Elizabeth in Rugen by Elizabeth von Arnim
A Compass Error by Sybille Bedford
A Favourite of the Gods by Sybille Bedford
Pleasures and Landscapes by Sybille Bedford
Two Middle-Aged Ladies in Andalusia by Penelope Chetwode
John Betjeman
The Faces of Justice by Sybille Bedford
The Catcher in the Rye by J.D. Salinger
Jigsaw by Sybille Bedford
A Visit to Don Otavio by Sybille Bedford
A Legacy by Sybille Bedford
The Semi-Attached Couple by Emily Eden
The Semi-Detached House by Emily Eden

Tea or Books? #46: Canadian vs Irish Literature, and My Name Is Lucy Barton vs Anything Is Possible

Elizabeth Strout is our author this episode – and we also dip a toe in the worlds of Canadian and Irish literature. Spoilers: we know a lot less than we should. Suggestions welcomed, please!

 

Tea or Books logoI’m off to Canada shortly, which is why we chose the first topic – and nothing much links Canada and Ireland other than the fact that I’ve thought they’d be interesting nations’ literature to talk about. In the second half, we turn to an American writer – a modern one, no less! – Elizabeth Strout. She’s literally still alive, guys. That modern.

Check out our iTunes page – rate/review through iTunes and all that – let us know which you’d pick in each category, and any other topics or authors you think we should cover in future episodes.

Look out for an inelegant bit where I sub in a clip because I got the title of a Stef Penney novel wrong. #Professional.

Here are the books and authors we mention:

Silas Marner by George Eliot
Ulysses by James Joyce
Paradise Lost by John Milton
Middlemarch by George Eliot
The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot
The Folded Leaf by William Maxwell
Jacob’s Room is Full of Books by Susan Hill
Howards End is on the Landing by Susan Hill
Agatha Christie
Another Part of the Wood by Beryl Bainbridge
Sweet William by Beryl Bainbridge
Injury Time by Beryl Bainbridge
Abigail’s Party by Mike Leigh
I Follow But Myself by Frank Baker
Miss Hargreaves by Frank Baker
Margaret Atwood
Alice Munro
Elizabeth Bowen
Molly Keane / MJ Farrell
Brooklyn by Colm Toibin
Seamus Heaney
Carol Shields
The Stone Angel by Margaret Laurence
The Tenderness of Wolves by Stef Penney
Over the Footlights by Stephen Leacock
Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Translations by Brian Friel
Oscar Wilde
George Bernard Shaw
The Gingerbread Woman by Jennifer Johnston
My Name Is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout
Anything Is Possible by Elizabeth Strout
Anne Tyler
Crow Lake by Mary Lawson (who is Canadian!)
Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout
A Compass Error by Sybille Bedford
A Favourite of the Gods by Sybille Bedford
Pleasures and Landscapes by Sybille Bedford

Tea or Books? #45: Do Literary Prizes Affect Our Reading and The Heir vs All Passion Spent

A heated conversation about literary prizes AND Vita Sackville-West. Roll up, roll up for episode 45!


 

Tea or Books logoIn the first half of this fortnight’s episode, we try to determine whether or not literary prizes affect our reading – which wanders off into a broader discussion of what we’re looking for from book prizes. It might get a bit controversial. And in the second half, we’re comparing two novels we love by Vita Sackville-West – The Heir and All Passion Spent.

Do let us know how you’d vote in each half, and rate/review if you would like to. Our iTunes page is over here, and we’ll back in about a fortnight with a couple of novels by Elizabeth Strout.

Here are the books and authors we mention in this episode:

Where Poppies Blow by John Lewis-Stempel
The Semi-Attached Couple by Emily Eden
The Semi-Detached House by Emily Eden
Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
Americanah by Chimananda Ngozi Adichie
Purple Hibiscus by Chimanada Ngozi Adichie
That Thing Around Your Neck by Chimanada Ngozi Adichie
Autumn by Ali Smith
Swing Time by Zadie Smith
4 3 2 1 by Paul Auster
History of Wolves by Emily Fridlund
Exit West by Mohsin Hamid
Elmet by Fiona Mozley
Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders
The Sense of an Ending by Julian Barnes
The Finkler Question by Howard Jacobson
Elizabeth Taylor
The Hothouse by the East River by Muriel Spark
The Mandelbaum Gate by Muriel Spark
Moon Tiger by Penelope Lively
Offshore by Penelope Fitzgerald
The Tenderness of Wolves by Stef Penney
Hilary Mantel
The Luminaries by Eleanor Catton
Harvest by Jim Crace
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J.K. Rowling
Lady Into Fox by David Garnett
Arnold Bennett
D.H. Lawrence
Radclyffe Hall
J.B. Priestley
Siegfried Sassoon
Miss Mole by E.H. Young
South Riding by Winifred Holtby
Aldous Huxley
L.P. Hartley
The Far Cry by Emma Smith
Margaret Kennedy
Ivy Compton-Burnett
Rose Macaulay
Ulysses by James Joyce
The Lesser Bohemians by Eimear McBride
A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing by Eimear McBride
Eva Trout by Elizabeth Bowen
The Heir by Vita Sackville-West
All Passion Spent by Vita Sackville-West
The Edwardians by Vita Sackville-West
Orlando by Virginia Woolf
No Signposts in the Sea by Vita Sackville-West
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
Greengates by R.C. Sherriff
Samson Agonistes by John Milton
Knole and the Sackvilles by Vita Sackville-West
The Easter Party by Vita Sackville-West
Grand Canyon by Vita Sackville-West
Dragon in Shallow Waters by Vita Sackville-West
Heritage by Vita Sackville-West
My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout
Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

Tea or Books? #44: Monogamous vs Polygamous, and The Village vs To Bed With Grand Music

After a bit of a hiatus, we’re back with an episode about Marghanita Laski and whether we read one book at a time or many books at once. And because that’s a bit of a mouthful, I’m calling it monogamous vs polygamous. Sorry if you’ve come to this podcast hoping for something else – but stay! We have books.


 

Tea or Books logoWe’ve really missed doing the podcast, so it’s great to be back! Do get in touch to let us know which you’d pick in each category, and any topics you’d like us to cover in future episodes. Our iTunes page is here, and we love reviews from those willing to go through the hoops required to leave them!

Here are the books and authors we mention in this episode (fewer than usual, which either means I forgot to write them down while editing the podcast, or we’ve lost our touch!):

Reading the Rocks by Brenda Maddox
Jane Austen at Home by Lucy Worsley
Contested Will by James Shapiro
The Village by Marghanita Laski
The Osbornes by E.F. Benson
Middlemarch by George Eliot
Henry James
The Road to Middlemarch by Rebecca Mead
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
The Diary of a Bookseller by Shaun Bythell
Three Fevers by Leo Walmsley
The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot
The Boat by L.P. Hartley
Marching With April by Hugh Charteris
And Even Now by Max Beerbohm
Secrets of a Woman’s Heart: Later Life of Ivy Compton-Burnett by Hilary Spurling
The Story of Classic Crime in 100 Books by Martin Edwards
Vanity Fair by W.M. Thackeray
To Bed With Grand Music by Marghanita Laski
The Village by Marghanita Laski
The Provincial Lady in Wartime by E.M. Delafield
Put Out More Flags by Evelyn Waugh
The Victorian Chaise-Longue by Marghanita Laski
Little Boy Lost by Marghanita Laski
Love on the Supertax by Marghanita Laski
Richmal Crompton
One Fine Day by Mollie Panter-Downes
Dorothy Whipple
Mrs Miniver by Jan Struther
The Heir by Vita Sackville-West
All Passion Spent by Vita Sackville-West

Tea or Books? #43: scientists vs clergymen, and As It Was vs Fair Stood the Wind for France

Scientists! Vicars! H.E. Bates! Helen Thomas!


 
Tea or Books logoWe’re popping in between holidays to record an episode about clergymen and scientists in novels – doubtless missing plenty of them, but thank you for everyone who tweeted in with your suggestions. We’d love to hear more!

In the second half, we discuss Helen Thomas’s memoir As It Was (1926) and H.E. Bates’ novel Fair Stood the Wind for France (1944) – which turn out to have more in common than we feared (and less than we initially thought). It’s quite the rollercoaster, guys.

Do check out our iTunes page, and you should be able to rate and review through iTunes apps and maybe podcast apps and one day I’ll work out how this happens. Below are the books and authors we mention in this episode:

Poldark series by Winston Graham
The Brother Gardeners by Andrea Wulf
The Lost Garden by Helen Humphreys
The Chateau by William Maxwell
The Boat by L.P. Hartley
The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley
A Perfect Woman by L.P. Hartley
Instead of a Letter by Diana Athill
The Warden by Anthony Trollope
Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope
Emma by Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen
Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Gilead by Marilynne Robinson
As For Me and My House by Sinclair Ross
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
Diary of a Provincial Lady by E.M. Delafield
Frost at Morning by Richmal Crompton
The Rector’s Daughter by F.M. Mayor
The Vicar’s Daughter by E.H. Young
The Clergyman’s Daughter by George Orwell
Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte
Under the Rainbow by Susan Scarlett
Clothes-pegs by Susan Scarlett
A Room With a View by E.M. Forster
Oscar and Lucinda by Peter Carey
Tess of the D’Ubervilles by Thomas Hardy
The Pastor’s Wife by Elizabeth von Arnim
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier
To The River by Olivia Laing
Appius and Virginia by G.E. Trevelyan
Hackenfeller’s Ape by Brigid Brophy
Dangerous Ages by Rose Macaulay
Agatha Christie
Oliver Sacks
Wives and Daughters by Elizabeth Gaskell
The Morning Gift by Eva Ibbotson
Middlemarch by George Eliot
The Diving-Bell and the Butterfly by Jean-Dominique Bauby
The Island of Dr Moreau by H.G. Wells
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Margaret Atwood
Famous Five series by Enid Blyton
As It Was by Helen Thomas
Fair Stood The Wind for France by H.E. Bates
Edward Thomas
World Without End by Helen Thomas
The Darling Buds of May by H.E. Bates
Love for Lydia by H.E. Bates
Under Storm’s Wing by Helen Thomas
To Bed With Grand Music by Marghanita Laski
The Village by Marghanita Laski

Tea or Books? #42: trains vs boats, and Illyrian Spring vs Hotel du Lac

Trains! Boats! Anita Brookner! Ann Bridge! This episode has it all.

Tea or Books logoBooks set on trains vs books set on boats – Rachel didn’t want us to do it but it happened. And… it was a roaring success? Right? Well, I had fun. We’re back on more stable ground with Illyrian Spring by Ann Bridge vs Hotel du Lac by Anita Brookner. And it’s only now that I’ve realised that both of those authors have the initials AB. Coincidence? Maybe, I don’t remember.

I’d love to hear more thoughts about trains and boats, and perhaps some defence from Anita Brookner aficionados… either way, give us a review on iTunes through your apps or whatnot, see our page on iTunes, and grab copies of As It Was by Helen Thomas and Fair Stood the Wind For France by H.E. Bates if you’d like to read ahead for the next episode.

The books and authors we mention in this episode are…

The Masters by C.P. Snow
The Warden by Anthony Trollope
Resurrection Year by Sheridan Voysey
Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
The Girl on the Train by Paul Hawkins
The Woman in Cabin 10 by Ruth Ware
Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
Famous Five series by Enid Blyton
The Railway Children by E. Nesbit
The Wheel Spins by Ethel Lina White
Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
The Mystery of the Blue Train by Agatha Christie
4.50 From Paddington by Agatha Christie
Cranford by Elizabeth Gaskell
Elizabeth Gill
The Pleasure Cruise Mystery by Robin Forsythe
Death on the Nile by Agatha Christie
Mystery in White by Joseph Jefferson Farjeon
The Girl on the Boat by P.G. Wodehouse
Mrs Harris Goes To New York by Paul Gallico
The Provincial Lady in America by E.M. Delafield
All Quiet on the Orient Express by Magnus Mills
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
The Train in the Meadow by Robert Nathan
Portrait of Jennie by Robert Nathan
The Enchanted Voyage by Robert Nathan
Mr Norris Changes Trains by Christopher Isherwood
No Signposts in the Sea by Vita Sackville-West
Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome
Three Men on a Bummel by Jerome K. Jerome
253 by Geoff Ryman
The Man in the Brown Suit by Agatha Christie
Andrew Martin
The English Passengers by Matthew Kneale
Star of the Sea by Joseph O’Connor
Master and Commander by Patrick O’Brian
Journey’s End by R.C. Sherriff
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis
Illyrian Spring by Ann Bridge
Hotel du Lac by Anita Brookner
Peking Picnic by Ann Bridge
All Passion Spent by Vita Sackville-West
Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont by Elizabeth Taylor
Family and Friends by Anita Brookner
Barbara Pym
As It Was by Helen Thomas
Fair Stood The Wind for France by H.E. Bates

Tea or Books? #41: novels set in one day vs many years, and The Forsyte Saga vs The Cazalet Chronicles

John Galsworthy! Elizabeth Jane Howard! Circadian novels! Find out what that means, and much more, in episode 41.


 
Tea or Books logoGuys, it was SUPER hot when we were recording this podcast. It’s rather cooler now that I’m editing, but I rather worry that I wasn’t making much sense in this episode… forgive any heat-induced nonsense. And potentially wavering audible quality. So hot. I have cunningly edited out the bits where I went to get more cold water.

(Blame that for me saying ‘Alan Bennett’ when I mean ‘Arnold Bennett’.)

In the first half, we look at the length we like books to cover – from books where all the action takes place in one day to those where it’s over many years. And, for the second half, we’ve read more than ever this time – two chunksters, albeit only the first books in their respective series. We’re comparing A Man of Property by John Galsworthy and The Light Years by Elizabeth Jane Howard – the openers to the Forsyte Saga and the Cazalet Chronicles.

Thanks for the new reviews, by the way! Feel free to add them through iTunes app, or you can explore our iTunes page. Let us know which you’d choose, and any recommendations!

The books and authors we mention in this episode are, as always, below:

My Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout
Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout
Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys
When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi
Another Time, Another Place by Jessie Kesson
One Fine Day by Mollie Panter-Downes
One Day by David Nicholls
London War Notes by Mollie Panter-Downes
Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
Can Jane Eyre Be Happy? by John Sutherland
Ulysses by James Joyce
Saturday by Ian McEwan
Seize the Day by Saul Bellow
Cheerful Weather for the Wedding by Julia Strachey
Miss Pettigrew Lives For a Day by Winifred Watson
The Hours by Michael Cunningham
Jodi Picoult
The Corner That Held Them by Sylvia Townsend Warner
Weatherley Parade by Richmal Crompton
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton
Life and Death of Harriett Frean by May Sinclair
Alas, Poor Lady by Rachel Ferguson
Us by David Nicholls
The Enchanted April by Elizabeth von Arnim
Agatha Christie
Marcel Proust
The Year of Reading Proust by Phyllis Rose
Shakespeare
Lord of the Flies by William Golding
Catherine Cookson
The Light Years by Elizabeth Jane Howard
A Man of Property by John Galsworthy
The L-Shaped Room by Lynne Reid Banks
A Pin To See The Peepshow by F Tennyson Jesse
The Old Wives’ Tale by Arnold Bennett
H.G. Wells
Illyrian Spring by Ann Bridge
Hotel du Lac by Anita Brookner

Tea or Books? #40: how do we arrange our bookshelves, and two E.H. Young novels

Alphabetical or thematic shelving? Miss Mole vs Chatterton Square? Episode 40 of ‘Tea or Books?’ continues answering the important questions that others don’t dare to.


 

Tea or Books logoIn the first half of this episode, Rachel and I address the pressing issue of how books are ordered on our shelves – alphabetical order, arranged thematically, or something else completely? We have fun with this one (thanks for the suggestion, Imogen!) and would love to know what any of you do with your shelves.

In the second half, we turn to the novelist E.H. Young and pit Miss Mole (1930) against Chatterton Square (1947), and I use the word ‘obfuscatory’. Buckle in. And suggestions for other Young novels to try would be very welcome!

Visit our iTunes page, leave us a review through iTunes if you’d like, and below are the books and authors we discussed in the episode. Fewer than usual!

Letters to Max Beerbohm and a few replies by Siegfried Sasson
Memoirs of a Fox-Hunting Man by Siegfried Sassoon
A Curious Friendship by Anna Thomasson
M.J. Farrell
Memoirs of an Infantry Officer by Siegfried Sassoon
Hackenfeller’s Ape by Brigid Brophy
The Signature of All Things by Elizabeth Gilbert
Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert
Howards End is on the Landing by Susan Hill
Phantoms on the Bookshelves by Jacques Bonnet
A Wreath of Roses by Elizabeth Taylor
A.A. Milne
Elizabeth von Arnim
Miss Mole by E.H. Young
Chatterton Square by E.H. Young
Ivy Compton-Burnett
E.M. Delafield
Matty and the Dearingroydes
by Richmal Crompton
Miss Pettigrew Lives For a Day by Winifred Watson
William by E.H. Young
The Misses Mallett by E.H. Young
The Light Years by Elizabeth Jane Howard
A Man of Property by John Galsworthy

Tea or Books? #39: spoilers or no spoilers, and Anne of Green Gables vs Daddy Long-Legs

Special guest Jenny joins us for episode 39 – discussing children’s classics and spoilers!
 

Tea or Books logoI was SO excited that Jenny agreed to join me and Rachel on ‘Tea or Books?’ while she was visiting England – her podcast, Reading the End, was one of the two book podcasts that inspired me to start my own, so it seems like a perfect circle that she joins us as we’re nearing our second anniversary.

In this episode, inspired by her blog and podcast name, Jenny asked if we discuss whether or not we like hearing spoilers – and, in the second half, we debate Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery and Daddy Long-Legs by Jean Webster. Guys, this podcast was SO FUN to record.

We were crowded around one mic – the first time Rachel and I have ever recorded a podcast in person – so forgive any issues with the sound quality or variability.

Here’s our iTunes page, and here are the books and authors we mention in this episode:

The Pelicans by E.M. Delafield
Country Notes by Vita Sackville-West
Friends and Relations by Elizabeth Bowen
The Daughter of Time by Josephine Tey
The Return of the King by J.R.R. Tolkien
Miss Mole by E.H. Young
Chatterton Square by E.H. Young
Once a Week by A.A. Milne
The Red House Mystery by A.A. Milne
23 Things They Don’t Tell You About Capitalism by Ha-Joon Chang
Long Live Great Bardfield by Tirzah Garwood
Not So Quiet by Helen Zenna Smith
All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Emma by Jane Austen
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Mansfield Park by Jane Austen
Sunlight on the Lawn by Beverley Nichols
Threads: the Delicate Life of John Craske by Julia Blackburn
Sylvia Townsend Warner
A Footman for the Peacock by Rachel Ferguson
We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves by Karen Joy Fowler
The Jane Austen Book Club by Karen Joy Fowler
We Have Always Lived in the Castle by Shirley Jackson
Two Gentlemen of Verona by William Shakespeare
The Secret History by Donna Tartt
Muriel Spark
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
Enid Blyton
Emily of New Moon by L.M. Montgomery
What Katy Did by Susan Coolidge
Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter
Anne of Avonlea by L.M. Montgomery
Anne of the Island by L.M. Montgomery
Dear Enemy by Jean Webster
Hamlet by William Shakespeare
On the Road by Jack Kerouac
The Children Who Lived in a Barn by Eleanor Graham

Tea or Books? #38: male characters by women vs female characters by men, and Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont vs At The Jerusalem

Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Bailey, and a bit of a debate about male and female characters. Here’s episode 38 – which is unusually short, but hopefully fun nonetheless. I’ve left in an amusing moment of drama…


 

Tea or Books logoMany thanks to Kaisha for suggesting men written by women vs women written by me – we had fun discussing it, and very much welcome everybody’s feedback. For the second half, we debate two books about old people’s homes – Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont by Elizabeth Taylor and At The Jerusalem by Paul Bailey, which have a sort-of connection that readers of Virago Modern Classics introductions might have cottoned on to.

Do let us know any topics you’d like us to discuss – and which you’d pick from each category. Check out our iTunes page over here – ratings and reviews through iTunes or podcast apps always much appreciated. And hopefully we’ll back with a special guest next time…

Books and authors we mention in this episode are as follows…

The Sleeper Awakes by H.G. Wells
Ann Veronica by H.G. Wells
The Time Machine by H.G. Wells
Don’t Tell Alfred by Nancy Mitford
Love in a Cold Climate by Nancy Mitford
The Pursuit of Love by Nancy Mitford
Pamela by Samuel Richardson
Clarissa by Samuel Richardson
Ian McEwan
Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
Gilead by Marilynne Robinson
Mrs Harris series by Paul Gallico
Miss Hargreaves by Frank Baker
Jacob’s Room by Virginia Woolf
Mrs Dalloway by Virginia Woolf
Orlando by Virginia Woolf
Provincial Lady series by E.M. Delafield
Ian and Felicity by Denis Mackail
Charles Dickens
Can You Forgive Her? by Anthony Trollope
The Eustace Diamonds by Anthony Trollope
The Warden by Anthony Trollope
Barchester Towers by Anthony Trollope
Sybil by Benjamin Disraeli
Adam Bede by George Eliot
The Professor by Charlotte Bronte
Shirley by Charlotte Bronte
Elizabeth Gaskell
Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
The Girl With Glass Feet by Ali Shaw
V.S. Naipaul
The Go-Between by L.P. Hartley
Mrs Palfrey at the Claremont by Elizabeth Taylor
At The Jerusalem by Paul Bailey
Ivy Compton-Burnett
Memento Mori by Muriel Spark
Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Daddy Long-Legs by Jean Webster